The Good Wolf Gazette (Our Blog!)

Massanutten Mountain: A One-Week Thru Hike

Massanutten Mountain: A One-Week Thru Hike

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Cold Weather Hiking and Camping: How to Keep Warm

Cold Weather Hiking and Camping: How to Keep Warm

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  • Advice from a Naturalist: Winter Hiking on the Potomac Heritage Trail!

    Advice from a Naturalist: Winter Hiking on the Potomac Heritage Trail!

    Don’t put your hiking shoes away for winter, because this is a great time to enjoy the Potomac Heritage Trail (PHT). The PHT is actually a network of trails stretching from near Fredericksburg to north of Harper’s Ferry, highlighting the natural and human history of the Potomac River and including a 15-mile contiguous natural-surface path from Great Falls National Park...

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  • Advice from a Naturalist: Christmas Fern

    Advice from a Naturalist: Christmas Fern

    After the last leaf has fallen and other plants have died back for winter, the Christmas Fern (Polystichum acrostichoides) brings a touch of green to the forest floor all winter with its evergreen fronds. Named for these fronds that persist through Christmas and all winter long, Christmas Fern is native to the eastern United States, and I have observed them...

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  • Advice from a Naturalist: Signal Knob in the Fall

    Advice from a Naturalist: Signal Knob in the Fall

      Do you want to see some fall color in the mountains, but you want to avoid the traffic on Skyline Drive in Shenandoah? Try Signal Knob on Massanutten Mountain in George Washington National Forest! Just over an hour's drive from Good Wolf Gear, the Signal Knob trailhead (38.935, -78.320) is your entry to this 10 mile loop on the Massanutten, Meneka Peak, and Tuscarora Trails. The...

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  • Hiking Pole Tips

    Hiking Pole Tips

    Here’s a "tip" for hiking poles: Rubber hiking pole tips reduce damage to the trail, are quieter on rocks and roads, and provide excellent grip on most surfaces. Quality tips will last 100s of miles, but they eventually become rounded off and need replacement. I put a wrap of cloth tape on my pole for a tighter fit, and I’ve...

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  • Dry Feet are Happy Feet

    Dry Feet are Happy Feet

    Dry feet are happy feet! 🐧 Wet feet have soft skin and are more susceptible to blisters. When my feet are wet from rain, mud, puddles, or sweat, I always take off my socks and shoes when I have an opportunity to dry them, like here, descending from North Carter Mountain in New Hampshire 🧦

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  • Hiking Poles

    Hiking Poles

    Remember to adjust your hiking pole length for an extended uphill or downhill trail. A shorter pole helps maintain a natural arm position going uphill as the trail is higher in front of you. Likewise, a longer pole is good for downhill. An inch or two (2.5-5cm) of adjustment is all it takes.I shortened my poles 2 inches ascending the...

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  • Mountainside Musings: Part Three

    Mountainside Musings: Part Three

    Always start out a little chilly; you’ll warm up quickly. Sweat and wet layers are not your friend. Have a layer handy if you stop for more than a few minutes. Drink some water every hour while hiking. Don’t stop until you’re peeing clear. Slow down after dinner to get through the night, then drink a full liter after breakfast...

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  • Mountainside Musings: Part Two

    Mountainside Musings: Part Two

    Good socks are a must. Close to 50% Merino wool. Turn them inside out and hang them in your tent at night. Carry at least 3 pairs: one to wear, one to change into, and a spare to sleep in.If you're wet and cold, the best thing to do is keep moving! Nothing generates body heat or dries wet shoes...

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  • Post-Backpacking Trip Tips

    Post-Backpacking Trip Tips

    A bandana or similarly sized non-cotton cloth is an essential backpacking accessory. Multiple uses from wiping your forehead or nose to helping keep sun off the back of your neck. I like to hang mine on one of the loops on my pack’s shoulder straps for easy access while hiking.When you return from any backpacking adventure, it’s always a useful...

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  • Mountainside Musings: Part One

    Mountainside Musings: Part One

    While many will say you don’t need a map or a compass on the AT, I always bring both. I like to know what’s to my left and right (in terms of terrain, side trails, water points, etc.) rather than just what’s in front or behind.Rather than one long length of para cord, I like to bring several smaller lengths...

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  • Spice Up Your Meals

    Spice Up Your Meals

    Consider bringing some condiments to spice up your freeze dried entrees.The typical dehydrated/freeze-dried entree says TWO servings. It may be, but I never have any trouble eating them both after a good hike! If temps are going below 45, it’s a good idea to put your water filter and your stove cartridge in your sleeping bag.

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  • Fuel Management

    Fuel Management

    I weigh my partially used fuel canisters and compute the remaining fuel. I use 6-12 grams per day depending on how cold the water and air are, if I make coffee, if I have to simmer, etc. This one has 94 grams of fuel left, so it will be more than enough for 5 nights. I'm eating my favorite @mtnhouse...

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  • What's In Your Toilet Kit?

    What's In Your Toilet Kit?

    What's in your toilet kit? This is what I have:1. Toilet paper in a zip plastic bag. You can remove the cardboard tube to make it smaller.2. Duece of Spades trowel in case there is no privy/ outhouse available. It really is the #1 for #2.3. Wet wipes, plus a plastic bag to pack out the wipes, because they can’t...

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